08. Presidents Day Blog.

08. Presidents Day Blog.


This week's special "President's Day Blog" takes a look at the Top 5 Presidential acts of Patriotism that helped shape the United States. We begin with the beginning of the country and the drafting of the Constitution, a document that might not exist today had it not been for George Washington's overwhelming sense of Duty to his country and Thomas Jefferson's way with words. Other topics include President Lincoln's role in ending the practice of slavery, President Kennedy's ability to unite and inspire a nation, and President Reagan's leadership that helped dismantle the Berlin Wall.

1. George Washington -- Do I gotta?

George Washington contemplates his Duty to America.
George Washington contemplates his Duty to America.
"Have I not done enough for my country?"
-- George Washington

After defeating the British Army in the Revolutionary war in 1783, George Washington resigned from the Continental Army instead of taking rule over the country as commander-in-chief for life, an act that solidified his view that government should be ruled by a republic rather than a king. For the next few years, he settled into a life at his plantation in Mount Vernon. However, in 1787, dissatisfaction with the Articles of Confederation required the drafting of the United States Constitution and George Washington was asked to preside over the Constitutional Convention. Reluctant to give up his life in retirement, he said, "Have I not done enough for my country?" George Washington questioned whether all of his years of Duty for his country allowed him to abstain from future obligations to service. After realizing the Constitutional Convention would probably fail without his guidance, he reluctantly agreed to oversee the convention -- which would ultimately lead to his presidency until 1797, two years before his death. George Washington's selfless sense of Duty and Patriotism should be emulated in our own lives.


See more...


1. Introduction to the Constitutional Convention.
2. Biography - George Washington.